THE LARGEST RAIN DANCE IN THE WORLD WAS ABOUT TO GET SAO PAULO INTO THE GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS AS A CITY UNABLE TO PROVIDE A BASIC RESOURCE TO ITS POPULATION: WATER.

In 2014, the biggest city in the Western hemisphere was facing its greatest water crisis in over 80 years. Millions of residents in Sao Paulo, Brazil faced daily water problems owing to bad water management on behalf of the local government. Our idea: create the biggest rain dance in history to hit a world record and be featured in the Guinness Book of World Records, thus calling attention to the source of the problem—the city itself.

This is a shot from the Cantareira Reservoir, the most relied-upon water resource in the city. We went there to shoot a teaser for the campaign.

This is a shot from the Cantareira Reservoir, the most relied-upon water resource in the city. We went there to shoot a teaser for the campaign.

 
 

WE WANTED TO CALL ATTENTION TO A CIVIC PROBLEM IN A NEW AND INNOVATIVE WAY -
BY GETTING INTO THE GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS.

When the media was focusing solely on the presidential race, our goal was to bring awareness to something much more important: the drought.

 
 
 

Using web film, guerrilla, and social networks, we invited people to join the largest rain dance in history.

 
 

THE TEASER WAS SHOT AT THE CITY’S MAIN RESERVOIR AND WAS PERFORMED BY A NATIVE INDIAN FROM AMAZONIA.

Images from the main reservoir of the city were graphic. It was dried up like a desert and the soil was entirely cracked. Since the project had support from Altukumã Yawalapiti, a native indian who grew up in the Yawalapiti tribe in Amazonia, he agreed to perform the sacred rain dance for the teaser. The act was recorded and launched with a message : "It will take more than one indian to make the rain fall".

 

We spray-painted invitations to the rain dance throughout the city using stencils and posted pics to Instagram. posts got more than 13k likes and reached around 300k followers.

Using catchphrases and the hashtag #RainDanceSP, leading to the event page on Facebook.

 
 

The event happened on November 21st, the day the main section of the Cantareira Reservoir would be out of water.

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THE RAINDANCE WAS ON THE COVER OF THE BIGGEST NEWSPAPER IN BRAZIL, FOLHA DE SAO PAULO.

One page media space in Folha de Sao Paulo costs US$100,000. Till this day, the newspaper does not allow advertisers to be on the front page, however we got on there without spending one penny.

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